Glenglish

Glenglish
“Glengish??” You will ask your self. What means glengish?
It’s a non existing word and I just made it up. 
It’s a combination of GLobal and ENGLISH.

I live in a very international environment with a lot of different expats. Expats from America, Egypt, England, Europe, Lebanon, Nepal, Pakistan, Philipines, Sri Lanka, just to name a few (in alphabetical order).
 The language we try to communicate together is in English.
But the way all those different people speak and pronounce the English language is very different.
English is for most of us (expats/immigrants) our second or third language, learned later in life. 
English is the language we pass on our messages, do our business; what, how, why and when we want something. It’s not the language we have a good conversation in. 
Not everybody has the same amount vocabulary. Some translated words don’t make sense in English. The sentence structure might be different. Not every language uses pronouns the same way as in English. The letters are differently pronounced. The rhythm is different.

You have to be a very creative and tolerant listener and speaker to make sense of what’s been said. Most of us multi-language-users are aware of this. When we don’t understand the other we try different ways; different words or use more figurative ways.

Often it’s the native English/American/Australian speakers who are hardest to understand as they miss the creativity in using their language a different way. 
When you say you don’t understand, they start to repeat and shout, instead of using a different word or description. When you can’t pronounce the ‘r’ they’re not able to make sense of what you’re saying. They talk to fast, they mumble or use a dialect, which is not easy to understand for people whose English is not the first language.

That’s why I made up the new word ‘Glenglish, a new language, language-form in which we use some basic forms and pronunciation of English, and be creative communicators to understand each other.
The native English/American/Australian linguistics won’t have to worry anymore that their language is being deformed as there is a new language. But which they have to learn too.

IFGAblogperson

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